Through the Eyes of an Editor

Before manuscripts morph into books, they go through several stages of development, which involves three or four different edits, depending on the work. If you’re new to the publishing world or you’ve never understood the editing process, I highly recommend watching this introductory┬ávideo by the incredible Joanna Penn. The first, and, for me, the most important, is developmental editing, which … Read More

A Writer’s Guide to Self-Care

It’s no secret that creatives are more at risk for depression, but for writers, it can be especially tough. Our craft is a solitary endeavor, spending hours in front of a keyboard. For those prone to feelings of loneliness, the isolation, the lack of sunlight and human interaction that writing often brings, can plunge them into the dark waters of … Read More

The Polarization of America

Polarization is the latest buzz word; it seems. The word originated in the scientific realm and was predominantly used for wave oscillations. Much like sound waves on a guitar string, the action of plucking the string creates a reaction that streams to both ends simultaneously, causing symmetrical vibrations which then turns into sound.   It’s an oversimplification, I know, but … Read More

Understanding Narrative Distance

Recently, I’ve been doing a slew of content editing, which is difficult for me at best. There are two reasons for this. One, as a writer, it’s my natural tendency to interject my voice into anything. I struggle to assess a story, the characters, the pacing, the voicing, the plot and any holes there might be, without changing the style … Read More

Tone and Mood, the Powerhouses of Writing

Most authors will say the best way to write a strong story is to show, don’t tell. But if the tone or mood of all that showing doesn’t match the intensity of the plot, the story still seems weak. Having all three is the trifecta of great storytelling. The difference between Tone and Mood Tone defines the character’s attitude. Is … Read More

Show, Don’t Tell

Ah, the blessed mantra of the writer–show, don’t tell. It’s chanted in fifth-grade classrooms all across the nation, and yet, even seasoned writers struggle with the concept. The difference between telling and showing Most young writers think of “telling” like a police report. It’s a monotonous sequence of events with no language that would sway the reader emotionally one way … Read More